Attractions

Stanley is the original headquarters of the Van Diemen’s Land (VDL) Company and was first named Circular Head and later renamed “Stanley” by Lord Stanley. The VDL Company pioneered European settlement in this region of
the island. Highfield Estate (pictured above) was built between 1832 and 1835 for Edward Curr, Colonial Chief Agent for the VDL Company. It still stands proudly today on the top of the Green Hills and is a lovely place to wander around and experience by sight and sound. Look out our dining room window and you can’t miss it.

A walk or short drive and you are at the Nut, a rocky outcrop that rises 152, from Bass Strait. Indigenous Australians called it “Moo-Nut-Re-Ker” and Matthew Flinders in 1798 compared it to a Christmas cake.

By 1851, other sailors referred to it as “the Nut” saying it was a “tough nut to crack” and the name stuck. Take the chairlift to the top or climb the summit by foot up a three-step steep, but sealed and hand-railed, pathway. A 40-minute walk around the top gives you some beautiful views.

 

Ready for some flat ground? Explore the historic graves of the Stanley Burial Ground, even if it’s just to marvel as the coastal view. There’s a map just inside the cemetery gate with information on graves of interest, such as Henry Hellyer who is responsible for a range of settlement names on the coast.

Explore the historic village of Stanley and uncover its past in the footsteps of Stanley–born writer and artist Meg Eldridge. The walk is self guided and explores the history, architecture and culture of this diverse village, enhanced with QR code scanning technology.

 

Wandering down the main street (Church St, pictured left) and you’ll find plenty of cafes and restaurants for a pit stop or quaint shops for some retail therapy. The cellar at the Hotel (under the footpath) is most interesting and at the Anglican Church, there is a discovery centre that showcases our local history.

 

Wander down Alexander Terrace to visit Joe Lyons Cottage, the birthplace of Australia’s only Tasmanian-born Prime Minister, in 1879. A magnificent display of photographs follow the life and times of Joe Lyons, his wife Enid, and their 11 children.

Heading towards the wharf on the left, you will come across the Seaquarium, where there are great displays of our Southern Rock Lobster (crayfish), King Crabs and local sea fish. Nearby you can take a cruise to a seal colony (pictured above). This cruise is weather-dependent and takes 1¾ hours with a good exhibition of Australian fur seas.

There is a nine-hole golf course at the southern end of town. Don’t miss Godfrey’s Beach (just below the house) for
a brisk walk anytime or a fresh swim in summer. Tatlow’s Beach (pictured above) at the southern end of town is long and flat with great views back to the township and has knee-deep water for miles in high tide.

 

The Green Hills (a 7km circuit) is a great walk or drive and on dusk towards later evening, you can often see wallabies, possums and rabbits, with penguin rookeries closer to the beaches. Grab a torch (kept at the back door) and off you go.

STANLEY ATTRACTIONS

  • Cafés + restaurants – Stanley has an impressive collection of restaurants and cafés for such a small town.
    Enjoy fresh seafood and shellfish, locally-pastured beef/lamb, locally matured cheese and Tasmanian wine and whiskey. Crayfish or Southern Rock Lobster can be purchased all year round in Stanley
  • Galleries and gift stores – including local handcrafted wood furniture and products, photography and art, antique shops as well and whiskey tastings
  • The Nut Reserve - 40 minute walk around the top of The Nut with outstanding views
  • Joe Lyon’s Cottage – birthplace of Australia’s only Tasmanian-born Prime Minister
  • Seaquarium – for location fish, king crabs and lobsters
  • Seal Cruise – to a nearby fur seal colony
  • Highfield Estate – historic VDL Company estate. Enjoy a self guided tour through this fascinating property with guides on hand to assist. Different interpretation in each room or part of the house
  • The historic town cemetery – dating back to the 1820s
  • Discovery Centre and Genealogy Centre for local history

 

BEYOND STANLEY

  • Smithton – the district’s commercial centre 15 minutes drive
  • Edge of the World – the most western point of Tasmania with the closest land mass being South America
  • The Arthur River – a leisurely cruise down the picturesque Arthur River
  • Marrawah and Green Point beaches – 1 hour west of Stanley, beautiful rugged West Coast and great
    surf beaches
  • Tarkine Adventures – 40 minutes east of Stanley, an adventure slide down to the forest floor, with a 2km of board walk at the base
  • Seven Mile Beach – 10km from Stanley (turn right into Anthony’s Rd), expansive beach, stretches from the mouth of the Duck River to the entrance of the West Inlet
  • Woolnorth – 1 hour west of Stanley, part of the Van Diemen’s Land Company on the far western tip of
    Tasmania. Has wind farm and property tours
  • Allendale Gardens – six hectares of landscaped gardens and 65 acres of rain forest, at Edith Creek,
    30 minutes from Stanley
  • Dip Falls and the Big Tree – a great picnic spot with steps down to the base of the falls, BBQ facilities and toilets; at Mawbanna, 45 minutes east of Stanley
  • Sumac Lookout, Lake Chisholm, Julius River, Dempester Plains and Wes Beckett Falls – lakes and forest reserves just inside the Tarkine with great short walks and plenty of picnic spots
  • Wilderness Day Tour – visit the heart of the Tarkine, including Julius River, Lake Chisholm, Sumac Lookout, Kanunnah Bridge and Dempster Plains
  • Rocky Cape National Park – a small un-manned national park 20 minutes east of Stanley, good walks and impressive beaches

 

Phone: (03) 6458 1149

6 Marshall St, Stanley Tasmania 7331

Hanlon House

Attractions

Stanley is the original headquarters of the Van Diemen’s Land (VDL) Company and was first named Circular Head and later renamed “Stanley” by Lord Stanley. The VDL Company pioneered European settlement in this region of the island. Highfield Estate (pictured above) was built between 1832 and 1835 for Edward Curr, Colonial Chief Agent for the VDL Company. It still stands proudly today on the top of the Green Hills and is a lovely place to wander around and experience by sight and sound. Look out our dining room window and you can’t miss it.

A walk or short drive and you are at the Nut, a rocky outcrop that rises 152, from Bass Strait. Indigenous Australians called it “Moo-Nut-Re-Ker” and Matthew Flinders in 1798 compared it to a Christmas cake.

By 1851, other sailors referred to it as “the Nut” saying it was a “tough nut to crack” and the name stuck. Take the chairlift to the top or climb the summit by foot up a three-step steep, but sealed and hand-railed, pathway. A 40-minute walk around the top gives you some beautiful views.

 

Ready for some flat ground? Explore the historic graves of the Stanley Burial Ground, even if it’s just to marvel as the coastal view. There’s a map just inside the cemetery gate with information on graves of interest, such as Henry Hellyer who is responsible for a range of settlement names on the coast.

Explore the historic village of Stanley and uncover its past in the footsteps of Stanley–born writer and artist Meg Eldridge. The walk is self guided and explores the history, architecture and culture of this diverse village, enhanced with QR code scanning technology.

 

Wandering down the main street (Church St, pictured left) and you’ll find plenty of cafes and restaurants for a pit stop or quaint shops for some retail therapy. The cellar at the Hotel (under the footpath) is most interesting and at the Anglican Church, there is a discovery centre that showcases our local history.

 

Wander down Alexander Terrace to visit Joe Lyons Cottage, the birthplace of Australia’s only Tasmanian-born Prime Minister, in 1879. A magnificent display of photographs follow the life and times of Joe Lyons, his wife Enid, and their 11 children.

Heading towards the wharf on the left, you will come across the Seaquarium, where there are great displays of our Southern Rock Lobster (crayfish), King Crabs and local sea fish. Nearby you can take a cruise to a seal colony (pictured above). This cruise is weather-dependent and takes 1¾ hours with a good exhibition of Australian fur seas.

There is a nine-hole golf course at the southern end of town. Don’t miss Godfrey’s Beach (just below the house) for a brisk walk anytime or a fresh swim in summer. Tatlow’s Beach (pictured above) at the southern end of town is long and flat with great views back to the township and has knee-deep water for miles in high tide.

 

The Green Hills (a 7km circuit) is a great walk or drive and on dusk towards later evening, you can often see wallabies, possums and rabbits, with penguin rookeries closer to the beaches. Grab a torch (kept at the back door) and off you go.

STANLEY ATTRACTIONS

  • Cafés + restaurants – Stanley has an impressive collection of restaurants and cafés for such a small town.
    Enjoy fresh seafood and shellfish, locally-pastured beef/lamb, locally matured cheese and Tasmanian wine and whiskey. Crayfish or Southern Rock Lobster can be purchased all year round in Stanley
  • Galleries and gift stores – including local handcrafted wood furniture and products, photography and art, antique shops as well and whiskey tastings
  • The Nut Reserve - 40 minute walk around the top of The Nut with outstanding views
  • Joe Lyon’s Cottage – birthplace of Australia’s only Tasmanian-born Prime Minister
  • Seaquarium – for location fish, king crabs and lobsters
  • Seal Cruise – to a nearby fur seal colony
  • Highfield Estate – historic VDL Company estate. Enjoy a self guided tour through this fascinating property with guides on hand to assist. Different interpretation in each room or part of the house
  • The historic town cemetery – dating back to the 1820s
  • Discovery Centre and Genealogy Centre for local history

 

BEYOND STANLEY

  • Smithton – the district’s commercial centre 15 minutes drive
  • Edge of the World – the most western point of Tasmania with the closest land
    mass being South America
  • The Arthur River – a leisurely cruise down the picturesque Arthur River
  • Marrawah and Green Point beaches – 1 hour west of Stanley, beautiful rugged
    West Coast and great surf beaches
  • Tarkine Adventures – 40 minutes east of Stanley, an adventure slide down to the forest floor, with a 2km of board walk at the base
  • Seven Mile Beach – 10km from Stanley (turn right into Anthony’s Rd), expansive beach, stretches from the mouth of the Duck River to the entrance of the West Inlet
  • Woolnorth – 1 hour west of Stanley, part of the Van Diemen’s Land Company on the far western tip of Tasmania. Has wind farm and property tours
  • Allendale Gardens – six hectares of landscaped gardens and 65 acres of rain forest, at Edith Creek, 30 minutes from Stanley
  • Dip Falls and the Big Tree – a great picnic spot with steps down to the base of the falls, BBQ facilities and toilets; at Mawbanna, 45 minutes east of Stanley
  • Sumac Lookout, Lake Chisholm, Julius River, Dempester Plains and Wes Beckett Falls – lakes and forest reserves just inside the Tarkine with great short walks and plenty of picnic spots
  • Wilderness Day Tour – visit the heart of the Tarkine, including Julius River, Lake Chisholm, Sumac Lookout, Kanunnah Bridge and Dempster Plains
  • Rocky Cape National Park – a small un-manned national park 20 minutes east of Stanley, good walks and impressive beaches

 

Attractions

STANLEY ATTRACTIONS

  • Cafés + restaurants – Stanley has an impressive collection of restaurants and cafés for such a small town. Enjoy fresh seafood and shellfish, locally-pastured beef/lamb, locally matured cheese and Tasmanian wine and whiskey. Crayfish or Southern Rock Lobster can be purchased all year round in Stanley
  • Galleries and gift stores – including local handcrafted wood furniture and products, photography and art, antique shops as well and whiskey tastings
  • The Nut Reserve - 40 minute walk around the top of The Nut with outstanding views
  • Joe Lyon’s Cottage – birthplace of Australia’s only Tasmanian-born Prime Minister
  • Seaquarium – for location fish, king crabs
    and lobsters
  • Seal Cruise – to a nearby fur seal colony
  • Highfield Estate – historic VDL Company estate. Enjoy a self guided tour through this fascinating property with guides on hand to assist. Different interpretation in each room or part of the house
  • The historic town cemetery – dating back to the 1820s
  • Discovery Centre and Genealogy Centre for local history

There is a nine-hole golf course at the southern end of town. Don’t miss Godfrey’s Beach (just below the house) for a brisk walk anytime or a fresh swim in summer. Tatlow’s Beach (pictured above) at the southern end of town is long and flat with great views back to the township and has knee-deep water for miles in high tide.

 

The Green Hills (a 7km circuit) is a great walk or drive and on dusk towards later evening, you can often see wallabies, possums and rabbits, with penguin rookeries closer to the beaches. Grab
a torch (kept at the back door) and off
you go.

Heading towards the wharf on the left, you will come across the Seaquarium, where there are great displays of our Southern Rock Lobster (crayfish), King Crabs and local sea fish. Nearby you can take a cruise to a seal colony (pictured above). This cruise is weather-dependent and takes 1¾ hours with a good exhibition of Australian fur seas.

Explore the historic village of Stanley and uncover its past in the footsteps of Stanley–born writer and artist Meg Eldridge. The walk is self guided and explores the history, architecture and culture of this diverse village, enhanced with QR code scanning technology.

 

Wandering down the main street (Church St, pictured left) and you’ll find plenty of cafes and restaurants for a pit stop or quaint shops for some retail therapy. The cellar at the Hotel (under the footpath) is most interesting and at the Anglican Church, there is a discovery centre that showcases our local history.

 

Wander down Alexander Terrace to visit Joe Lyons Cottage, the birthplace of Australia’s only Tasmanian-born Prime Minister, in 1879.

A magnificent display of photographs follow the life and times of Joe Lyons, his wife Enid, and their 11 children.

A walk or short drive and you are at the Nut, a rocky outcrop that rises 152, from Bass Strait. Indigenous Australians called it “Moo-Nut-Re-Ker” and Matthew Flinders in 1798 compared it to a Christmas cake.

By 1851, other sailors referred to it as “the Nut” saying it was a “tough nut to crack” and the name stuck. Take the chairlift to the top or climb the summit by foot up a three-step steep, but sealed and hand-railed, pathway.
A 40-minute walk around the top gives you some beautiful views.

 

Ready for some flat ground? Explore the historic graves of the Stanley Burial Ground, even if it’s just to marvel as the coastal view. There’s a map just inside the cemetery gate with information on graves of interest, such as Henry Hellyer who is responsible for a range of settlement names on the coast.

Stanley is the original headquarters of the Van Diemen’s Land (VDL) Company and was first named Circular Head and later renamed “Stanley” by Lord Stanley. The VDL Company pioneered European settlement in this region of the island. Highfield Estate (pictured above) was built between 1832 and 1835 for Edward Curr, Colonial Chief Agent for the VDL Company. It still stands proudly today on the top of the Green Hills and is a lovely place to wander around and experience by sight and sound. Look out our dining room window and you can’t miss it.

BEYOND STANLEY

  • Smithton – the district’s commercial centre 15 minutes drive
  • Edge of the World – the most western point of Tasmania with the closest land mass being South America
  • The Arthur River – a leisurely cruise down the picturesque Arthur River
  • Marrawah and Green Point beaches – 1 hour west of Stanley, beautiful rugged West Coast and great surf beaches
  • Tarkine Adventures – 40 minutes east of Stanley, an adventure slide down to the
    forest floor, with a 2km of board walk at the base
  • Seven Mile Beach – 10km from Stanley (turn right into Anthony’s Rd), expansive
    beach, stretches from the mouth of the Duck River to the entrance of the West Inlet
  • Woolnorth – 1 hour west of Stanley, part of the Van Diemen’s Land Company on the far western tip of Tasmania. Has wind farm and property tours
  • Allendale Gardens – six hectares of landscaped gardens and 65 acres of rain forest, at Edith Creek, 30 minutes from Stanley
  • Dip Falls and the Big Tree – a great picnic spot with steps down to the base of the falls, BBQ facilities and toilets; at Mawbanna, 45 minutes east of Stanley
  • Sumac Lookout, Lake Chisholm, Julius River, Dempester Plains and Wes Beckett Falls – lakes and forest reserves just inside the Tarkine with great short walks and plenty of picnic spots
  • Wilderness Day Tour – visit the heart of the Tarkine, including Julius River, Lake Chisholm, Sumac Lookout, Kanunnah Bridge and Dempster Plains
  • Rocky Cape National Park – a small un-manned national park 20 minutes east
    of Stanley, good walks and impressive beaches